A Developing Picture? Part One: c. 1855-1914

Join Archive Specialist Chris Tracy as he explores the roles and experiences of women in society as portrayed in the Picture Norfolk photographic collections. In this, the first in a three-part series, we will examine what Norfolk’s historic photographs can tell us about life for women in the decades preceding World War One. This event is inspired by the British Library’s “Unfinished Business: The Fight for Women’s Rights” exhibition.

If you would like to join us live on Zoom for parts two and three, book your free place here.

Episode 48: Freedom from Control and Violence

In this talk (originally recorded over Zoom in March 2021), Community Librarian Rachel Ridealgh explores material from Norfolk Heritage Centre’s ephemera collection that looks at how women have demanded freedom from control and violence, and autonomy over their own bodies. Discover more about how local women became involved in campaigns for equality during the 20th century, both locally and nationally.

The fight for women’s rights is unfinished business. From bodily autonomy and the right to education, to self-expression and protest, the British Library’s Unfinished Business: The Fight for Women’s Rights exhibition explores how feminist activism in the UK today has its roots in the complex history of women’s rights.

Norfolk Libraries’ online exhibition shows Norfolk’s role in the long struggle for equality for women. Be inspired by the Norfolk women who were at the forefront of the Women’s Liberation Movement in the 1970s and 80s and learn more about national and international feminist campaigns. Discover here the stories behind Rosie’s Plaques – the handmade unofficial blue plaques celebrating local historic women which appeared on the streets of Norwich in 2019 – and find out more about the Norfolk Women of History who shaped this county.

See below for the images referred to throughout the talk. We hope you enjoyed listening!

Please note: This talk will include some references to violence against women and also reproductive rights, including abortion.

Episode 46: Women’s Rights in Norwich, 1970s – 1990s

In this talk, Community Librarian Rachel Ridealgh explores what material from Norfolk Heritage Centre’s ephemera collection can tell us about the movement for women’s liberation in Norwich during the 1970s – 1990s. Learn more about how local women became involved in campaigns for equality, peace, and human rights during this time, both locally and nationally.

The fight for women’s rights is unfinished business. From bodily autonomy and the right to education, to self-expression and protest, the British Library’s Unfinished Business: The Fight for Women’s Rights exhibition explores how feminist activism in the UK today has its roots in the complex history of women’s rights.

Norfolk Libraries’ online exhibition shows Norfolk’s role in the long struggle for equality for women. Be inspired by the Norfolk women who were at the forefront of the Women’s Liberation Movement in the 1970s and 80s and learn more about national and international feminist campaigns. Discover here the stories behind Rosie’s Plaques – the handmade unofficial blue plaques celebrating local historic women which appeared on the streets of Norwich in 2019 – and find out more about the Norfolk Women of History who shaped this county.

See below for a video version of the recording, and the images referred to throughout the talk. We hope you enjoyed listening!

Episode 45: Queer Norwich, Walk Three

In the final part of Jo and James’ LGBTQ+ walking tours of Norwich series, we begin on King Street, head past Norwich Castle to Ber Street, cross the river via the All Hallows Mission, and end our tour at The Castle pub at the bottom of Kett’s Hill.

Follow using the map above, and find some of the images referenced throughout the talk in the slideshow below. We hope you enjoy this walk – let us know which future audio walking tours would interest you. Thanks for listening!

  1. The Buff Coat pub, Cattlemarket Street
  2. First article in a Norwich newspaper about Norwich Pride, 2009
  3. EDP headline from newspaper sandwich board, 2019
  4. Antoinette Hannent (Black Anna) in The Jolly Butchers pub
  5. Antoinette Hannent (Black Anna) in The Jolly Butchers pub
  6. Image depicting the burning of Cicely Ormers at Lollards Pit, for heresy

Images from Picture Norfolk and Norfolk Heritage Centre collections, Norfolk Library and Information Service.

Episode 44: Queer Norwich, Walk Two

In the second of their three part “Queer Norwich” walking tour series, librarian Jo Foster-Murdoch and local historian James Watts explore the LGBTQ+ stories to the north of the City centre – starting in Westwick Street, heading up to St Augustines, down Magdalen Street and across the river, ending at St Michael-at-Plea on Queen Street.

Follow using the map above, and find some of the images referenced throughout the talk in the slideshow below. We hope you enjoy this walk. Thanks for listening!

  1. St Augustine’s swimming pool
  2. 135 Magdalen Street, Norwich – formerly the Jacquard Club (© Copyright Evelyn Simak and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.)
  3. Magdalen Street flyover, 1973
  4. Fye Bridge from Fishergate, 1958
  5. St James Mill (Jarrolds) from Whitefriars, 1953
  6. Father Ignatius plaque on Elm Hill
  7. Portrait of Father Ignatius
  8. St Michael-at-Plea church, 1990s

Images from Picture Norfolk, Norfolk Library and Information Service (unless stated otherwise).

Episode 43: Queer Norwich, Walk One

This podcast episode is hosted by Jo Foster-Murdoch, a Community Librarian for Norfolk Libraries, and James Watts, a local historian with a specialist knowledge of LGBTQ+ histories. Jo and James lead us on a walking tour of Norwich City centre highlighting sites of interest, including pubs, hotels, shops and historic buildings, which tell stories of Norwich’s queer history.

On Walk One, Jo and James start at the Forum and take us on a circular walk via Chapelfield Gardens, the Maddermarket Theatre, and Norwich Market. Follow using the map above, and find some of the images referenced throughout the talk in the slideshow below. We hope you enjoy this walk – watch this space for further audio tours of the City. Thanks for listening!

  1. The Theatre Tavern, 1959
  2. The Shakespeare, 1933
  3. Inside the Shakespeare
  4. Norwich Woolworths, 1924
  5. The Assembly House, 1956
  6. Chapelfield Gardens, 1965
  7. Ninhams Court, 1952
  8. Maddermarket Theatre, 1930s
  9. Inside the Maddermarket Theatre, 1930s
  10. The Castle Hotel, 1936
  11. The Castle Hotel
  12. The Gaumont Theatre, Haymarket, early 1900s

Images from Picture Norfolk, Norfolk Library and Information Service.

Episode 42: Conversations with Strangers: Herb Schwartz

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This week’s podcast is another from the archives of the American Library in Norwich (formerly the Second Air Division Memorial Library). Their “Conversations with Strangers” series features United States Air Force veterans of WWII discussing their experience of war; from their relocation to the sleepy farming towns of Norfolk, England, to the extraordinary flight combat missions they undertook.

This episode features Herb Schwartz (445th Bomb Group), filmed by students from Norwich University College of the Arts at the 61st convention of the 2nd Air Division Ass, Dallas, Texas (17th – 20th October 2008).

See below for the original video recordings of Herb.

Continue reading “Episode 42: Conversations with Strangers: Herb Schwartz”

Episode 41: Conversations with Strangers: Frank and Robert Birmingham

AL primary logo SM

The podcast episode this week is another from the “Conversations with Strangers” series, which features United States Air Force veterans of WWII discussing their experience of war; from their relocation to the sleepy farming towns of Norfolk, England, to the extraordinary flight combat missions they undertook.

This episode features brothers Frank and Robert Birmingham (458th Bomb Group) in conversation, filmed by students from Norwich University College of the Arts at the 61st convention of the 2nd Air Division Ass, Dallas, Texas (17th – 20th October 2008).

Click below to view the original video recordings of the conversation with Frank and Robert.

Continue reading “Episode 41: Conversations with Strangers: Frank and Robert Birmingham”

Episode 40: Conversations With Strangers: Robert Lee Swofford

AL primary logo SM

This week’s podcast is another recording from the archives of the American Library in Norwich (formerly the Second Air Division Memorial Library). Their “Conversations with Strangers” series features United States Air Force veterans of WWII discussing their experience of war; from their relocation to the sleepy farming towns of Norfolk, England, to the extraordinary flight combat missions they undertook.

This episode features Robert Lee Swofford (445th Bomb Group) in conversation, filmed by students from Norwich University College of the Arts at the 61st convention of the 2nd Air Division Ass, Dallas, Texas (17th – 20th October 2008).

Click below to view the original video recordings of the conversation with Robert.

Continue reading “Episode 40: Conversations With Strangers: Robert Lee Swofford”

Episode 39: Conversations with Strangers: Jack Dyson

AL primary logo SM

This week is the second episode of “Conversations with Strangers,” from the archives of the American Library in Norwich (formerly the Second Air Division Memorial Library). Their “Conversations with Strangers” series features United States Air Force veterans of WWII discussing their experience of war; from their relocation to the sleepy farming towns of Norfolk, England, to the extraordinary flight combat missions they undertook.

This episode features Jack Dyson (445th Bomb Group) in conversation, recorded by students from Norwich University College of the Arts at the 61st convention of the 2nd Air Division Assn, Dallas, Texas (17th – 20th October 2008).

Click below to view the original video recordings of the conversation with Jack.

Continue reading “Episode 39: Conversations with Strangers: Jack Dyson”